#6 :: HYDRABAD

#6 :: HYDRABAD

Acrylic on canvas :: 870 x 550 :: (Commissioned work) Hydrabad (Hyderabad) was a full-rigged sailing ship weighing 1350 tons, built of Lowmoor iron in 1865 at Port Glasgow. She was originally the pleasure yacht of the Rajah of Hyderabad. The ship struck a severe storm while bound for Adelaide, Australia from Lyttelton, New Zealand on 24 June 1878, and was beached on Waitarere beach, with no loss of life. The wreck still lies on the beach, albeit now largely buried by the sand.

#5 - WAHINE

#5 - WAHINE

Acrylic on canvas :: 900 x 500 :: (SOLD) On April 10th 1968, the Lyttleton to Wellington passenger ferry Wahine (317814) struck Barrett Reef and eventually sunk as she was entering Wellington harbour during a raging storm. It was to be New Zealand’s most iconic maritime disaster with the loss of 52 lives. The severity of the storm continues to be the measure of severe weather systems in New Zealand.

#4 - WILLIE M

#4 - WILLIE M

Acrylic on canvas :: 900 x 600 (SOLD) The Willie McLaren, No. 71,462, was a copper sheathed wooden barque built at Prince Edward Island in October 1874. On the evening of October 5 1889, carrying a cargo of coal from Newcastle, she grazed Steeple rock while beating against a fresh north-west wind and foundered almost abreast of the pilot station. An unexploded bomb was found in the wreck in the 1970’s and coal still litters the sea floor.

#3 - TUI

#3 - TUI

Acrylic on canvas :: 900 x 600 (SOLD) On November 1 1886 this Dunedin-built iron steamer had its bottom ripped out en route from Wellington to Foxton, and now lies 500m north of Barrett Reef at the entrance to Wellington Harbour.

#2 - F69

#2 - F69

Acrylic on canvas :: 900 x 600 (SOLD) Formerly known as the frigate HMNZS Wellington, F69 was bought by the Sink F69 Charitable Trust for $1 and on November 13 2005 was sunk 400m off Houghton Bay as a dive site and artificial reef. The wreck has since broken into three pieces but is still popular with divers.

WRECKS SERIES

There are many shipwrecks that lie in and around Wellington harbour. Some of these have lain, for the most part unseen, for over 100 years. They form an important part of our maritime history and their stories provide a sense of wonder and intrigue that inspire this series.